If you dread the annual fall leaf-raking marathon, we have good news for you: Raking and collecting leaves every autumn is a tradition without scientific basis. Research has proven that mowing leaves into your lawn can improve its vigour, and observation shows that un-raked leaves in planting beds don’t smother shade-tolerant perennials.

 

Do you really need to rake all those leaves? Improve Your Soil by Raking Less
alternatives to raking that might be better for your lawn and for the environment.
Leaves, Your own source of FREE fertilizer A little effort can supply an organic source of nutrients for your plants. Here are two ways to use your leaves. Pile composting for mixed borders Rake the leaves into loose piles or in wire bins about 4 feet square within your borders. Mix in a few shovelfuls of soil, and add 20 to 30 gallons of water to aid decomposition. Pull the piles or bins apart in the spring, and spread the decayed leaves throughout the border (photo, right). Cover the decayed leaves with a 1-inch-deep layer of fresh mulch. Sheet composting for annual beds Rake your leaves into the empty beds, and shred them with a lawn mower. Sprinkle the leaves with a 1-pound coffee can’s worth of 5-10-5 fertilizer per 100 square feet of garden. Turn the leaves, and water thoroughly to disperse the fertilizer, which speeds decay. Turn the leaves again in spring, and plant right through the remaining clumps, which will provide nutrients as they decompose.
Leave the leaves? good or bad? The real answer to this question is NO, but it comes with one catch……The most important point with fall cleanup is that the tree leaves are not covering a significant portion of the turfgrass canopy.  10-20% coverage of your lawn can be okay. Excessive leaf matter on your lawn going into winter is bad for several reasons.  First, it will smother the grass and if not removed very soon in the spring it will inhibit growth.  Second, it can promote the snow mold diseases.  And finally, turf damage from critters (voles, mice) can be more extensive in the spring. that discourage insects is the best way to maintain a healthy lawn. Based upon research at several universities, the organic matter and nutrients from leaves mown into lawn areas has been proven to improve turf quality. Successfully mulching leaves into a lawn canopy requires more frequent mowing in the fall and possibly several passes with the mower to mulch the leaves sufficiently.  Specialized mulching mowers can also be purchased, and these mower types will also be beneficial year-round to mulch grass leaves into the canopy. Building Plant bed with leaves. Under trees or in other shady spots where a lawn won’t grow, you can create planting beds from fallen leaves as a source of soil- building organic matter. Shredded leaves applied as mulch protect tree roots from heat and cold and retain soil moisture during dry spells. Municipalities, both large and small, spend thousands, even millions, of dollars each year to collect, transport, and process autumn leaves, tying up resources that could be used elsewhere in our communities. If we all keep our leaves on our properties, we will improve our gardens, save money, and enhance the environment we all share.

The homeowner basically has three options to make sure that leaves are not covering a significant portion of their lawn:

 1. Rake them up or use a blower- compost the leaves or dispose of them

 2. Use the bagging attachment for your mower: compost the leaf/grass mix or dispose of

 3. Mulch the leaves with a mower (i.e. chop them into small pieces so they will fall into the canopy). 

 

This is the preferred option at Plant it Earth because the nutrients and organic matter will benefit the lawn and soil.

 

If you dread the annual fall leaf-raking marathon, we have good news for you: Raking and collecting leaves every autumn is a tradition without scientific basis. Research has proven that mowing leaves into your lawn can improve its vigour, and observation shows that un-raked leaves in planting beds don’t smother shade-tolerant perennials.

 

Do you really need to rake all those leaves?
alternatives to raking that might be better for your lawn and for the environment.
TM Improve Your Soil by Raking Less
Leave the leaves? good or bad? The real answer to this question is NO, but it comes with one catch……The most important point with fall cleanup is that the tree leaves are not covering a significant portion of the turfgrass canopy.  10-20% coverage of your lawn can be okay. Excessive leaf matter on your lawn going into winter is bad for several reasons.  First, it will smother the grass and if not removed very soon in the spring it will inhibit growth.  Second, it can promote the snow mold diseases.  And finally, turf damage from critters (voles, mice) can be more extensive in the spring. that discourage insects is the best way to maintain a healthy lawn. Based upon research at several universities, the organic matter and nutrients from leaves mown into lawn areas has been proven to improve turf quality. Successfully mulching leaves into a lawn canopy requires more frequent mowing in the fall and possibly several passes with the mower to mulch the leaves sufficiently.  Specialized mulching mowers can also be purchased, and these mower types will also be beneficial year-round to mulch grass leaves into the canopy. Building Plant bed with leaves. Under trees or in other shady spots where a lawn won’t grow, you can create planting beds from fallen leaves as a source of soil-building organic matter. Shredded leaves applied as mulch protect tree roots from heat and cold and retain soil moisture during dry spells. Municipalities, both large and small, spend thousands, even millions, of dollars each year to collect, transport, and process autumn leaves, tying up resources that could be used elsewhere in our communities. If we all keep our leaves on our properties, we will improve our gardens, save money, and enhance the environment we all share.
Leaves, Your own source of FREE fertilizer A little effort can supply an organic source of nutrients for your plants. Here are two ways to use your leaves. Pile composting for mixed borders Rake the leaves into loose piles or in wire bins about 4 feet square within your borders. Mix in a few shovelfuls of soil, and add 20 to 30 gallons of water to aid decomposition. Pull the piles or bins apart in the spring, and spread the decayed leaves throughout the border (photo, right). Cover the decayed leaves with a 1-inch-deep layer of fresh mulch. Sheet composting for annual beds Rake your leaves into the empty beds, and shred them with a lawn mower. Sprinkle the leaves with a 1-pound coffee can’s worth of 5-10-5 fertilizer per 100 square feet of garden. Turn the leaves, and water thoroughly to disperse the fertilizer, which speeds decay. Turn the leaves again in spring, and plant right through the remaining clumps, which will provide nutrients as they decompose.

The homeowner basically has three options to make sure that leaves are not covering a significant portion of their lawn:

 1. Rake them up or use a blower- compost the leaves or dispose of them

 2. Use the bagging attachment for your mower: compost the leaf/grass mix or dispose of

 3. Mulch the leaves with a mower (i.e. chop them into small pieces so they will fall into the canopy). 

 

This is the preferred option at Plant it Earth because the nutrients and organic matter will benefit the lawn and soil.

 

If you dread the annual fall leaf-raking marathon, we have good news for you: Raking and collecting leaves every autumn is a tradition without scientific basis. Research has proven that mowing leaves into your lawn can improve its vigour, and observation shows that un-raked leaves in planting beds don’t smother shade-tolerant perennials.

 

Do you really need to rake all those leaves?
alternatives to raking that might be better for your lawn and for the environment.
Improve Your Soil by Raking Less
Leave the leaves? good or bad? The real answer to this question is NO, but it comes with one catch……The most important point with fall cleanup is that the tree leaves are not covering a significant portion of the turfgrass canopy.  10-20% coverage of your lawn can be okay. Excessive leaf matter on your lawn going into winter is bad for several reasons.  First, it will smother the grass and if not removed very soon in the spring it will inhibit growth.  Second, it can promote the snow mold diseases.  And finally, turf damage from critters (voles, mice) can be more extensive in the spring. that discourage insects is the best way to maintain a healthy lawn. Based upon research at several universities, the organic matter and nutrients from leaves mown into lawn areas has been proven to improve turf quality. Successfully mulching leaves into a lawn canopy requires more frequent mowing in the fall and possibly several passes with the mower to mulch the leaves sufficiently.  Specialized mulching mowers can also be purchased, and these mower types will also be beneficial year-round to mulch grass leaves into the canopy. Building Plant bed with leaves. Under trees or in other shady spots where a lawn won’t grow, you can create planting beds from fallen leaves as a source of soil-building organic matter. Shredded leaves applied as mulch protect tree roots from heat and cold and retain soil moisture during dry spells. Municipalities, both large and small, spend thousands, even millions, of dollars each year to collect, transport, and process autumn leaves, tying up resources that could be used elsewhere in our communities. If we all keep our leaves on our properties, we will improve our gardens, save money, and enhance the environment we all share.
Leaves, Your own source of FREE fertilizer A little effort can supply an organic source of nutrients for your plants. Here are two ways to use your leaves. Pile composting for mixed borders Rake the leaves into loose piles or in wire bins about 4 feet square within your borders. Mix in a few shovelfuls of soil, and add 20 to 30 gallons of water to aid decomposition. Pull the piles or bins apart in the spring, and spread the decayed leaves throughout the border (photo, right). Cover the decayed leaves with a 1- inch-deep layer of fresh mulch. Sheet composting for annual beds Rake your leaves into the empty beds, and shred them with a lawn mower. Sprinkle the leaves with a 1-pound coffee can’s worth of 5-10-5 fertilizer per 100 square feet of garden. Turn the leaves, and water thoroughly to disperse the fertilizer, which speeds decay. Turn the leaves again in spring, and plant right through the remaining clumps, which will provide nutrients as they decompose.

The homeowner basically has three options to make sure that leaves are not covering a significant portion of their lawn:

 1. Rake them up or use a blower- compost the leaves or dispose of them

 2. Use the bagging attachment for your mower: compost the leaf/grass mix or dispose of

 3. Mulch the leaves with a mower (i.e. chop them into small pieces so they will fall into the canopy). 

 

This is the preferred option at Plant it Earth because the nutrients and organic matter will benefit the lawn and soil.

 

PLANT IT EARTH NATURAL LAWN CARE
PLANT IT EARTH NATURAL LAWN CARE
PLANT IT EARTH NATURAL LAWN CARE